In this guide, learn how to serve corn to your baby – either for baby-led weaning or as a baby food puree. Corn is a good source of carbohydrates and fiber and is a great first food for babies 6 months and up. Serve corn as a baby food puree, as a solid for the finger food stage, or for baby-led weaning.

Graphic for post - corn for baby, puree and baby-led weaning for 6+ months. Image is of a green baby plate on a white counter showing different ways to cut and serve corn to baby.

Medically reviewed and cowritten by Jamie Johnson, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN), and Lauren Braaten, Pediatric Occupational Therapist (OT).

Corn Baby Food

Did you know that corn is rich in important vitamins and minerals, such as magnesium, biotin, vitamin C and iron? In addition, corn is high in insoluble fiber, which can help regulate bowel movements and promote healthy digestion.

Corn can be a choking hazard for babies however, especially when whole, loose kernels of corn are served. You might be wondering, how do I serve corn for baby-led weaning?

In this guide, we’ll cover all the information you need in order to safely serve corn to your baby. You’ll learn about the nutritional benefits, FAQs, helpful tools, as well as expert feeding tips.

First time making homemade baby food? Then, I would suggest that you start by reading my very in-depth Guide on how to Make Homemade Baby Food – which goes over all the important information such as the best cooking tools to have on handsafe storagehow to know when baby is ready for solidshow to introduce pureesthe best first foods for baby, and more! If you are doing Baby-Led Weaning, then be sure to check out my Complete Guide to Baby-Led Weaning – which covers what exactly is baby-led weaning, to every parent’s concern of baby-led weaning and choking, this guide goes over it all. I will also share how to know when baby is ready for BLW, the top 10 best first foods, a helpful sample blw feeding schedule, helpful tools to have on hand, and much much more!

2 ears of corn on a white countertop.

Reasons to Love Corn for Baby

  • delicious baby food purees – 4-6+ months
  • great for baby-led weaning – 6+ months 
  • also great for the finger food stage – 9+ months
  • full of essential nutrients for baby
  • different ways for baby to eat – spoon-fed or self-feed 
  • easy to make
  • purees are freezer-friendly
  • can use fresh or frozen corn

Benefits of Corn for Baby

  • Contains fiber, which supports digestive health and can help with constipation
  • A good source of vitamin C, which is important for the immune system and iron absorption
  • Loaded with B vitamins which are necessary for brain and cognitive function
  • Contains iron, which helps with neurodevelopment, carrying oxygen to the body, and preventing iron deficiency anemia

Fresh Corn vs. Frozen or Canned Corn: Generally, they are all pretty similar in nutrients, but there are a few things to keep in mind. Fresh and frozen corn are preferred since they are the least processed. If buying frozen, make sure you read the ingredients list and avoid packages that have added sodium. Frozen and canned corn are nice to have on hand when you need a veggie in a pinch or want to cut down on your prep time. If buying canned corn, try to get the “low sodium” or “no salt added” cans and rinse and drain the corn before serving to further reduce the sodium content.

Frequently Asked Questions

When can corn be introduced to Baby?

Whether you’re starting your baby on purees or are doing baby-led weaning, corn can be a wholesome and enjoyable first food for your baby! When a baby can start on solids is determined by their own rate of development, which generally comes between 4-6 months of age for purees and or after 6 months for baby-led weaning. Some of the developmental milestones your baby needs to reach in order to start on solids include: if your baby has solid control of their head and neck, if your baby has doubled in weight, and if your baby is reaching for or opening their mouth when you eat. Before you start your baby’s feeding journey, you should consult with your pediatrician to make sure your child is developmentally ready.

Is corn a choking hazard?

Yes, whole grain kernels of corn are a choking hazard for babies under 12 months. If serving whole grain kernels, serve them on the cob after cooking to reduce the risk.

Is corn a common allergen?

No, corn is not a common allergen, however, as with any food, start with a small portion and be aware of any signs that might be an allergic reaction after introducing it.

Tools Needed

These tools will make it a lot easier for you to serve corn to your baby. For more of my favorite kitchen tools, make sure to check out my shop.

Corn Puree Instructions

To make corn puree from sweet corn, add husked corn cobs to a medium pot with boiling water. Let cook for 5 minutes and then cover and take off the heat for an additional 5 minutes. Remove cobs and let cool slightly.

Stand the corn cobs up in a bowl and run a knife down and across the kernels, as deep as you can go to remove them. Transfer the kernels to a blender or food processor. I added a pinch of paprika to this puree but that is optional. Blend until smooth.

Steaming Corn: another way to cook corn is to add a steamer basket with husked corn cobs to a medium saucepan with 2 inches of boiling water. Cover and steam on high until tender, for about 6 minutes.

Corn for Baby-Led Weaning Instructions

Corn is a great food for your baby to self-feed, whether for baby-led weaning, which happens around 6 months of age, or during the finger foods stage at 9 months.

Cooked, on cob and cut into smaller 2-3 inch pieces, or pureed (6 – 12 months): Serving cooked corn on the cob is easier for baby to hold and is safer than serving loose corn kernels at this stage. You can also take a knife and cut away half of the kernels and serve just the cob to lower choking risks further. Baby will still get experience with tasting the corn, as well as practice with oral motor skills by munching on the corn cob. Serving pureed corn is also a wonderful option for this age.

Cooked, whole kernels or corn on the cob (12 + months): You can start to offer cooked, loose corn kernels at this stage, as well as continue to offer corn on the cob. Consider serving small amounts of corn at a time to minimize overstuffing the mouth with too many kernels. Toddlers at this age may still be perfecting their pincer grasp, as well as practicing with a spoon.

Storage Instructions

Corn Puree

Refrigerator

You can store it in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 4 days. 

Freezer

This puree can be frozen for up to 4 months.

  • Spoon puree into a freezer storage container – do not overfill. 
  • Place the lid on the storage container or cover it with a piece of saran wrap and label it with the date and recipe name. 
  • Place the tray into the freezer and let freeze completely – preferably overnight. 
  • Pop out the baby food cubes and place them in a zip-lock baggie or stasher bag – don’t forget to re-label the baggie or stasher bag for future reference.

Baby-Led Weaning

You can store cut blackberries in an air-tight container in the fridge for up to 2 days.

Combination Purees

While Corn Baby Food is great by itself, it’s also super easy to mix and match with other nutrient-dense baby food purees. Give these fun flavor combos a try!

More Corn Recipes

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Carrot, Corn & Pumpkin Baby Food Puree

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Sweet Corn, Squash + Apple Baby Food Puree

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This Sweet Corn, Squash and Apple Baby Food Puree combination tastes so good! Filled with 3 wholesome ingredients, this puree not only tastes great but it is also loaded with essential vitamins and minerals to help baby grow big and strong.
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2 small white bowls full of summer baby food purees.

Turkey, Corn + Zucchini Baby Food Puree

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This summer puree is filled with fresh sweet corn, sun ripened zucchini, zesty chives and some ground turkey for some extra protein!
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Expert Feeding Tips

  • It may seem counterintuitive, but serving cooked corn on the cob is safer for babies than serving whole, loose corn kernels. Letting baby gnaw on the cob can be helpful for developing oral motor skills.
  • Serving pureed corn is a great way to add nutrients to other pureed veggies and fruits, as well as help baby get used to different textures of foods.
  • Once your toddler starts transitioning to eating whole, cooked corn kernels, be sure to serve smaller portions at a time to avoid overstuffing.
A green kids plate with corn for baby on it shown how to serve it different ways.

Get the recipe: Corn Baby Food: Puree & Baby-Led Weaning

5 stars (1 rating)
In this guide, learn how to serve corn to your baby – either for baby-led weaning or as a baby food puree. Corn is a good source of carbohydrates and fiber and is a great first food for babies 6 months and up. Serve corn as a baby food puree, as a solid for the finger food stage, or for baby-led weaning.

Ingredients 

  • 2 ears corn, husked and cut into 2-3" sections
  • pinch paprika, chili powder, or cumin (optional)

Instructions 

  • In a medium saucepan, bring water to a boil over medium heat. Place the corn cobs into the boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Cover, take off the heat and let steam for an additional 5 minutes or until tender. Let cool slightly.
    A silver saucepan with boiled corn in small pieces.

For Baby Food Puree

  • Stand the corn cobs up in a bowl and run a knife down and across the kernels, as deep as you can go to remove them. Transfer the kernels to a blender or food processor. I added a pinch of paprika to this puree but that is optional. Blend for 1-2 minutes, or until smooth.
    Pureed corn in a clear blender on a white counter.

For Baby-Led Weaning

  • Serve in an age-appropriate way.
    graphic for post - corn for baby-led weaning. Image is of a green baby plate with different ways to serve corn to baby.
  • If serving for 6-12 months, make sure to serve the corin in 2-3 inch sections with a cut down the middle of each row of kernels.
    Hands cutting a corn cob row of kernels in half.

Notes

Age: 6+ months
Storage: you can store the corn puree in an air-tight container in the fridge for up to 4 days or in the freezer for up to 4 months. You can store the corn pieces in an air-tight container in the fridge for up to 4 days. 
Spices/Herbs: Adding spices to your baby’s foods is a great way to introduce more complex flavors at an early age. Some great spices and herbs to add to cooked corn are a pinch of mild chili powder, garlic powder, paprika, and cumin, or you can add in a pinch of chopped fresh parsley, chives, mint, and cilantro.

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